The high school Social Studies program is designed to develop the ability to think critically about the human condition in order to make informed decisions that guide social action. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own cultural identities, and recognize and respect cultural similarities and differences within a global perspective.

 
 

World
Civilizations and
Geography

 

Grade: 9/10
Length: 1 Year
Credit: 1.0
Text: World Civilizations: A Handbook of Resources

This course offers students an understanding of early human civilizations and how they are connected to the world today. Students will study the geography and cultures of four great civilizations from Asia, Africa, the Mid East and South America. Students will use their analytical skills to compare and contrast, understand cause and effect, evaluate multiple causalities and gain a more thorough historical understanding of the peoples and cultures of the world. Students will examine maps, primary sources, learn to draw inferences and discuss varied historical perspectives regarding significant events in human history. They will undertake creative activities, imaginative writings, role plays, group projects and oral presentations to grasp the beliefs, lifestyle and governance of those from four major world civilizations.

World History

Grade: 10/11
Length: 1 Year
Credit: 1.0
Textbook: World History: The Human Journey

Students of World History will gain a chronological understanding of the development of different cultures around the world from roughly the year 1500 to the 20th Century. Students will use their analytical skills to compare and contrast, understand cause and effect, evaluate the effect of climate and environment, and understand how our modern world has come to be shaped by people and events from the past. Students will also be exposed to, and will make determinations and draw conclusions for themselves from, a wide array of historical perspectives regarding significant events in human history. Students examine the events that have shaped today’s world. Topics include effects of contact between cultures, the influence of religion on history, different political philosophies and how they interact with one another, revolution and change, and the impact of the individual on world affairs.

United States
History

Grade: 11/12
Length: 1 Year
Credit: 1.0
Textbook: American Nation, Boyer

This course presents a chronological understanding of the development of the United States beginning with pre-Columbian American civilizations up to the modern era. Students will analyze the cause and effect relationships in U.S. history; For example, “How did the search for a shorter route to Asia lead to the landing of Columbus in the West Indies?” and “How did increasing colonial discontent with British taxes play a part in bringing about the Revolutionary War?” Furthermore, students will be exposed to various primary source documents to further enhance their historical understanding of significant events. Using primary documents, the class will study the ideas which led to the creation of the Constitution and the underlying principles of American democracy. The course analyzes the rise of the U.S. as a world power, the major wars, and cultural and political developments in the U.S. Daily reading, writing, and class discussions are required. Students will read and write daily, discuss the assigned readings and debate viewpoints on many issues. Topics for discussion include: Revolution, Civil Rights, Immigration, Global Leadership.

Asian Studies

Grade 10-12
Length: 1 Semester
Credit. 0.5
Textbook: ASIAN STUDIES SOURCEBOOK

Asian Studies looks at the events, people, and ideas in the modern Asian world. Through primary and secondary source analysis, group and individual activities, and web based activities, students will cover major international events such as European and Asian imperialism, the Chinese Civil War, nationalist movements of the 1930s and 1940s, World War II, decolonization, The Cold War and its affects on Asia (including the “Hot Wars” in Korea and Vietnam), the rise of communism in East and S. East Asia, and the contemporary Asian environment. Among the topics we will examine the social and cultural movements of the century, including passive resistance and non-violence, revolution, the Great Leap Forward, and the Cultural Revolution.

20th Century
World History

Grade: 10-12
Length: 1 Semester
Credit: 0.5
Textbook: Contemporary Readings, Newspapers, Magazines, On-Line Sources

The 20th Century World allows students to explore the key social, political, and cultural events of the 20th Century. Students read and discuss primary and secondary sources, including documents, songs, music, literature, poetry, artwork, and film. Students will analyze major international events such as the Russian Revolution, totalitarian extremism, African decolonization, The Cold War, conflicts in the Middle East, the fall of the Soviet Union, and the world today. Through group work, individual study, research, and web based activities, students examine the social and cultural movements of the century, including nationalist movements in Europe and Africa, resistance and anti-fascist movements, America’s Civil Rights Movement and modern-day fundamentalism. Students will research the impact of major political philosophies such as democracy, communism, and fascism on world events and analyze how history has shaped the world.

Anthropology

Grade: 9-12
Length: 1 Semester
Credit: 0.5

Anthropology is an introductory course offering a survey of cultural and physical anthropology. During the semester we will be examining humans as biological organisms. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes of evolution, the mechanisms of genetic inheritance, contemporary human variation, the place of people in nature, primate characteristics, and human evolution as seen mostly through the fossil record. Students will read, write and discuss man’s evolution, while examining stories, objects and primary documents.

 
 
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